New York

Gay New York

The Big Apple. The city that never sleeps. The financial, musical, shopping and art capital.....New York City must be one of most dynamic cities in the world. It's on 24/7 and you will be unable to see, live and enjoy everything in just a weekend. Just dive in for a few days and visit all the landmark icons, shop around, go to a theater and enjoy the NYC nightlife. Most hotels in Manhattan are situated south of Central Park between 28th and 59th Street.From there you can walk or go by underground to all the public attractions and neighborhoods, like the Empire State Building, Broadway, the Meat Packing District, SoHo, the Greenwich gay area or Central Park.The Out in trendy gayborhood Hell's Kitchen is New York's own gay resort, right in the middle of all the action.Hotels in Brooklyn tend to be a little cheaper than on Manhattan. However, you would need to cross the river from and to Manhattan.

The Secret Underground New York

Urban explorer .... goes places nobody in their right mind would go, examining hidden infrastructure — the tunnels, subways, and sewers — of cities all over the world. Watch him reveal New York City's secret underground world.

Then, as if that weren't cool enough, the pair take us into the underground Canal Street sewer in Manhattan. The sewer is New York's first covered sewer after being roofed over in 1812 — previously, it was just an open ditch — a "canal" — and it's what gave Canal St. its name.

The Canal Street ditch was a stream and was apparently large enough that prior to European settlements, natives of the region could canoe (at least at high tide) from the Hudson River, along the stream, and into Collect Pond (site of today's Columbus Park, it supplied the city's water until it became horribly polluted by the growing New York in the 18th Century), carrying deliveries of oysters that would be opened and dried for winter food.

Next up on Duncan and Wonder's urban spelunking is the old Amtrak tunnels next to the Lincoln Tunnel. Duncan shows off the jury-rigged ancient timber atop crumbling natural rock that's holding up New York City streets.

Last up, as police birds circle overhead, Duncan scales the Williamsburg Bridge to get an unbelievable look at the city of New York. It's amazing.

While you can safely travel the 6 train to see the old City Hall subway station, we definitely wouldn't suggest taking a run at any of these other locations unless you're traveling with someone experienced like Duncan. It's dangerous, illegal and potentially hazardous to your health

The City Hall Station was the original southern terminus of the first "Manhattan Main Line" built by the Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) Company. The line, opened in 1904, was intended to be a showpiece and crown jewel of the new subway system. Unlike the rest of the line, City Hall featured tall tile arches, brass fixtures, and skylights that ran along the entire curve of the station — a sort of miniature Grand Central Station. In fact, befitting the elegance of the station, it was even the chosen place for hanging the commemorative plaques recognizing the achievement of building the underground train system.

However, thanks to an immediate need to expand the original IRT line with newer, longer cars, the City Hall Station was closed just a few decades later on December 31, 1945. The gorgeous wrought iron skylights were covered over and the station was boarded up.

Although it would spend the next few decades closed to the public, the tracks were still used as the turnaround point for the 6 train after its final Brooklyn Bridge stop. So, while the station was lost to the ages, it was not forgotten.

About a decade ago, New York City began the long and arduous process of restoring the City Hall Station as New York's transit museum, but security concerns that started before September 11, 2001, fully killed the idea after the twin towers fell.

Row NYC Times Sq

700 8th Avenue, New York

Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. Please note that all Special Requests are subject to availability and additional charges may apply.

For added convenience, information and arrangements for shows, transportation, and shopping are available through the concierge services. Located in the lobby, the District M Bar serves a daily continental breakfast each morning and is available for drinks in the evening. The City Kitchen restaurant, also located on site, offers New York city specialties.

The GEM Hotel, Chelsea

300 West 22nd Street, New York

Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. Please note that all Special Requests are subject to availability and additional charges may apply.

A flat-screen TV with cable channels, as well as an iPod docking station is provided. The rooms are fitted with a private bathroom equipped with a bath or shower. For your comfort, you will find bathrobes, free toiletries, and a hairdryer.

Hotel Edison

 228 West 47th Street, New York
Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. Please note that all Special Requests are subject to availability and additional charges may apply.

The Manhattan Edison Hotel - Triumph Group offers concierge service, 24-hour business, and fitness centers and a transportation desk. The Edison Ballroom provides event space.

The Rum House, featuring a copper and wood themed design, is only a minute away from Edison and offers live entertainment on occasion. There are several other dining options in the area as well.

Hudson New York Central Park

   358 West 58th Street, New York
Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. Please note that all Special Requests are subject to availability and additional charges may apply.

Guests can relax with a game of billiards, read in the library, or catch up with family and friends on business center computers. During the summer, the Sky Terrace offers rooftop views of the city and the Hudson River.

The Hudson Morgans Original is located within 20 minutes' walk to Times Square. The Museum of Modern Art is within 15 minutes' walk from the hotel.

 

Marriott Hotel

218 West 50th Street, New York

Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. Please note that all Special Requests are subject to availability and additional charges may apply.

A flat-screen TV and a small refrigerator with free water are offered in citizenM's rooms, which feature a centralized digital system that controls lighting, music, and electronics. Bathrooms include Hansgrohe rain showers and oversized bathroom amenities. Wi-Fi and movies are provided free of charge.

New York Marriott Marquis

1535 Broadway, New York

Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. Please note that all Special Requests are subject to availability and additional charges may apply.

New York Marriott Marquis has meeting space, a Broadway Ballroom with 29,000 square feet, three restaurants, the lounge offering panoramic views of Times Square and two terraces. Amenities like a concierge lounge, cloakroom, a safe, a cash machine, WiFi and onsite shops including a souvenir shop are available for guests’ convenience.

The OUT NYC

    510 West 42nd Street, New York
The Out is a gay hotel in a very central location. Guest can enjoy the spa center that features a gym, sauna, massage room, and 2 spacious hot tubs all enclosed in a glass-covered atrium. The hotel also features the XL Nightclub.

Guests of The Out can enjoy the wellness center that features a gym, sauna, massage room, and 2 spacious hot tubs all enclosed in a glass-covered atrium. The hotel also features the 42 West, which offers live entertainment in its 14,000 square-foot venues, and an internationally recognized garden. The lobby hosts contemporary art exhibits

The Standard High Line New York

 848 Washington Street, New York
Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. Please note that all Special Requests are subject to availability and additional charges may apply
There is a 24-hour front desk at The Standard, High Line New York. The hotel offers several on-site bars and restaurants. There is also 24-hour room service and complimentary bike hire as this pet-friendly hotel.There is a 24-hour front desk at The Standard, High Line New York. The hotel offers several on-site bars and restaurants. There is also 24-hour room service and complimentary bike hire as this pet-friendly hotel.

Ace Hotel

  20 West 29th Street, New York
Guests are required to show a photo identification and credit card upon check-in. Please note that all Special Requests are subject to availability and additional charges may apply.

Situated inside a historic building, the Ace Hotel offers a unique style developed by local artists and designers. Guests at the hotel can eat at the Breslin Restaurant or The John Dory Oyster Bar. Enjoy gourmet coffee from Stumptown Coffee Roasters Cafe and live music in the hotel lobby.

Gay New York: a guide to clubs, bars, drag shows and queer culture

 

YC is a gay-friendly town with a variety of neighborhoods offering pockets of queer culture and nightlife, each with its own fruity flavor. In the past decade, a lot of the action has left “the big city” for Brooklyn districts such as Williamsburg and Bushwick, but there’s still plenty of adrenaline left in Manhattan to make heat-seeking worthwhile there. The West Village – the hub of the modern gay movement, thanks to the 1969 rebellion at the Stonewall Inn – still bristles with gay bars and drag clubs, mostly unaffected hangouts such as the appealing Pieces, and The Monster, a two-floor nightlife emporium with the piano bar on top and disco down below.

The internet has taken a big bite out of clubbing, as you hardly need to go to a bar anymore to meet Mr. Right-For-An-Hour, but these venues still provide valuable get-together spaces, as well as places to see drag performers, who are more popular than ever in the era of RuPaul’s Drag Race. There are also cultural events all over the city, from NewFest (the city’s LGBT film festival) to concerts, such as a Kiki and Herb reunion (Justin Vivian Bond and Kenny Mellman reprising their act as a woozy cabaret couple). And even guys without muscles have a chance at some fun.

Arts

In Soho, Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art (admission free) is a small treasure that celebrates the work of queer artists past and present. Its emphasis is on providing a space for work that might be excluded elsewhere, including very racy, but artistic, exhibits of LGBT erotica.

The Public Theater is a great place to see theater, and it is committed to diversity. It is among the best in the city at programming with a strong eye to diverse voices, and it also attracts some of the best talents. The Tony-winning Fun Home played there before its current run on Broadway. Fun Home’s main character is a butch lesbian, which is new for a Broadway musical. But the show doesn’t just break ground; it digs up the memories that are buried there, both joyful and tragic, and airs them in poignant and intelligent ways.

Also, the FringeNYC Festival in August has a lot of queer content. It’s usually around 200 shows performing in a range of venues, with different levels of professionalism. It provides the joy of finding a diamond in the rough, a real jewel in a bauble tiara. The shows turn over quickly – they’re very low-tech – so you really get the stripped-down theater, which can be more fun. It’s a nice way to dip your foot in the talent pool. Urinetown and some other shows that have had an afterlife started there, but it’s more of its own reward. Don’t go thinking you’re necessarily going to see the best show you’ve ever seen, but it’s fun as an experience.

Drag and cabaret

Boots and Saddle Drag Lounge is a legendary bar with a new venue, at 100A 7th Avenue South, that’s better than its first one. It’s bigger, and there’s finally a stage – a big stage. You can’t go in there without seeing a drag show. There’s a variety of live singing and dancing and good cheap drinks. It has around five shows a day and does a drag brunch on Saturday and Sunday. There’s bright lighting, and it’s very laid-back, very enjoyable.The uptown drag restaurant Lips is known for its entertainment and drinks. The girls put on a terrific show that’s good, campy fun. It’s especially fun for birthdays and bachelorette-style parties. There’s a celebration, with a crown and everything. The birthday boy or girl goes onstage and gets harassed by a drag queen, and that includes gay birthdays and other gay parties. The decor adds to the whole spectacle – it's very dragging Disneyland, with neon and sparkles and over the top Liberace-style chic. Definitely worth a booking.

Industry Bar, on W 52nd Street in Hell’s Kitchen, is one of the most popular and successful bars in the area and it has a strong appreciation for the value of drag queens. On Thursday night, there’s the “Queen” show, one of New York’s only drag revues, with a different theme every week. It’s a splashy show starring “Holly Dae and the greatest queens on earth”. Bob the Drag Queen, who’s a very zany performer, has a night at Industry. Rumour has it she’s going to be on RuPaul’s Drag Race, so she’s going to blow up big. The bar is very homey and lounge, with lots of side seating areas and always something to take in.

 

 

Clubs

Viva on Saturdays at Stage 48 is always packed with gorgeous guys. The party, hosted by nightlife vets John Blair, Beto Sutter, and Ric Sena, attracts the muscle queen scene. It’s definitely high energy and a reliable party. It’s one of the longest running, successful parties on a weekly basis, and it never fails. The party took off from day one and has kept its mojo.

Ric Sena’s party Alegria – a large-scale event at rotating clubs such as Webster Hall – is the best. It’s full of energy, with amazing performances, visuals, and lighting. The last one I went to was Batman-themed and had an actual Batman car hanging from the ceiling and the DJ dressed as the Joker. The crowd is a very good mix, reflecting the melting pot aspect of New York, not just muscle queens.

I also wouldn’t miss Everything at Diamond Horseshoe, hosted by Brian Rafferty and Joe Roszak. It’s a fabulous venue in the basement of the Paramount Hotel, where earlier in the night they have the lavish Queen of the Night review for tourists. You have to go down four flights of stairs, all marble, and it feels really atmospheric. Last time I went there were performance artists, aerial acrobatics, individuals on stilts, and neon body painting.

Pubs & Bars

Boxers NYC in Chelsea is a great cruise bar. There are always cute people there. It also has bar food, like pizza, wings and mozzarella sticks. It’s friendly, with a good after-work crowd. But it’s a sports bar, and it’s a bit ironic that it has sports games on that no one pays any attention to. A straight guy owns it, and I guess he doesn’t know any better.

I enjoy the long-running West Village bar Julius because you can’t beat its $3 happy hour drinks from 4 pm to 9 pm and I also like the older, neighborhood crowd – it’s packed full of regulars. It’s the gay Cheers – if you’re 70, lol, though there’s usually a mix, with other types struggling in. It serves great food and it’s so cheap.

When you want something a little dark, there’s the Boiler Room in the East Village. It’s actually a good place to take an ugly date. It has a pool table and also the photo booth is pretty fun. The ambiance draws an edgier, more hipster, crowd than most of the other bars. I like it for the sense of mystery and a feeling of possibility.

Lesbian Bars

One of the few go-to lesbian bars that still exists is the Cubby Hole, on the corner of W 12th and W 4th Streets. Any night of the week, you can go and have a good time. It’s packed on weekends, but it’s a good Tuesday or Wednesday hangout when other places might be dead. It’s very much a neighborhood lesbian bar. You’ll run into friends you know from different places, and though there are straight folks who go there too – men and women – there’s definitely a lesbian vibe. It’s small and cozy and there’s a jukebox.On Friday night, you can also hang out in what many call “the Bermuda Triangle”: the confluence of the Duplex, Stonewall Inn, and the Monster. The Duplex is a cabaret/hang out with a mixed crowd – an especially good place to hang at when the weather is warmer, given the cruise outside patio (and on Saturdays, there’s a big lesbian crowd upstairs). On Fridays, upstairs at the Stonewall is a girl thing called Lesbo-A-Gogo, with DJs and go-go dancers. And the same night, across the street at Monster is Hot Rabbit, a girl event with gogo dancers and offbeat performances. It has different DJs serving up good dance music, and it has a good vibe, and a lot of women turn out there. Between those places, you’ll usually be able to find something that appeals to you. You’ve got three chances to find what you want.Dagger is a monthly party held at a space it keeps unnamed. There is a cast of DJs, like JD Samson. The cover charge is on a sliding scale based on your gender. Women get in cheaper, “homo cis dudes” pay more, and “str8 cis dudes” pay a lot more. It’s mostly women, but queer-flavored, and attracts a much younger crowd, with a Williamsburg-hipster feel, and it’s trans friendly.